Have fun with language. Make a list!

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Let me start by saying I am not a fan of Shakespeare.  I have always found reading his work boring.  Maybe there isn’t enough yolk in my head to like what I have been told is one of the greats.  However, I do think it is possible to appreciate something without liking it.  Shakespeare did invent many new words, many of which I like, so, I came up with a few myself.

1.snowblowhard–one who chooses to live in the South, but complains about everything Southern (like the weather, for instance).  A friend of a friend (on Facebook)  referred to Florida Christmases as fake because we didn’t have snow.

2.raggedbagger–a woman who carries a designer handbag while dressed like a bum.

3.paddyfibber–one who claims to be Irish on St. Patrick’s Day.

4.stackie (see shelfie:  http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=shelfie)–a stack, or tower, of books that have not yet made it to a shelf.

5.crucifixation (I can’t take credit for this one, as my brother made it up)–one who is fascinated by the macabre elements of religion (exorcism, speaking in tongues, etc.)

6.manicurist–I know this is already a word, but I think it should be brought back.  Nail technician?  Please!

7.multi-tabber (liken to multi-tasker)–one who has at least several tabs open on their Internet at one time.  This is me.

8.mom joke (a.k.a. lame joke)–if you knew my mom, you’d understand.  An example of a mom joke:  Q:  What did the one casket say to the other casket that had a cold?  A:  Is that you coffin?

9.femoir–a fake memoir.  See:  http://listverse.com/2010/03/06/top-10-infamous-fake-memoirs/

10.fictionary–this list!

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Maybe one of the amendments to my list of New Year’s Resolutions should be to learn at least one new word a day, which would be an accomplishment for me, as I tend to have the memory of a goldfish.

One of the reasons I enjoyed the Shopaholic series so much was because it was set in England, and I learned some British words/slang.  Words matter.  One of my favorite English phrases is “cheesed off” (which means disgusted or fed up).

When I lived in Montana, they used the word “spendy” to mean pricey.  In Southeast Missouri, where my family is from, they use the term “whopper-jawed” (I think that means jacked-up); my parents still say “warsh” instead of “wash”.

Local lingo adds an authentic flavor to a piece of writing.  A setting (just like a time period) is an important character, even if the place is made up.  I’d rather see an author make up a setting than do injustice to a real one.  “Peyton Place” was made up, but felt very real (I’m referring to the movie and not the book).  Of course, it was based on a real place, like Sinclair Lewis’s Zenith, Missouri, in “Elmer Gantry” (another example where the movie was far better than the book).  Even Oz felt like a real place–just not on Earth.

One of the many reasons I love Christian author Linda Hall’s books is because almost all of them are set in Maine–a place I’d love to visit someday.  I also tend to gravitate towards books set in New Orleans (ironically, a place I have no desire to visit); the only reason I read any of Elin Hilderbrand’s novels was because most of them were set on Nantucket Island (where I’ve wanted to visit ever since I became a fan of the “Wings” TV series).  Dorothea Benton Frank’s “Sullivan’s Island” has made me want to go there, too.  However, the last two authors only made me want to visit the settings of their novels, not read another one.

Setting is great, but character still matters.

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2 thoughts on “Have fun with language. Make a list!

  1. I’m not a big fan of Shakespeare either. I have a hard time writing setting into my stories but I love dreaming up or writing characters. As you know I especially love dialogue. I find you can draw conclusions about the people without having tons of detailed paragraphs. I’m glad I read Thoreau’s “Walden Pond” because it had some great philosophical principals and it described beautiful scenery….BUT I’d read “To Kill A Mockingbird” over and over again, not because it was set in Southern Alabama but because of its memorable, amazing characters. Another great post Sarah! Keep writing and sharing!

    • I think some people feel they’re supposed to like Shakespeare, when they really don’t. “To Kill a Mockingbird”–one of the Great American Novels. I’d be happy writing just one of those! If you love writing dialogue, perhaps screenwriting is the way to go. I love “Our Town” by Thornton Wilder, because Grover’s Corners reminds me of Poplar Bluff, Missouri, where I was born. Thanks for the comment!

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