Book Review: Good Rosie!

Good rosie

As part of my Post-K Summer Reading Boot Camp:
https://sarahleastories.com/2019/06/08/post-k-summer-reading-boot-camp-2019/

When I opened this book and saw that it was it in comic strip form, I had my reservations; what’s more, the book is separated into chapters which was unnecessary–especially since each page is already broken up into panels.

Good Rosie! is about dogs meeting in the park.  That’s it.  

The illustrations were better than I could do, but I’ll stick to the Clifford the Big Red Dog series; even without a speaking part, Clifford has way more personality.  With the exception of the number of words on the page, Rosie reads like a Dick and Jane reader–text not necessarily meant to be interesting but to teach children to learn to read.

The author tries to be cute with Fifi (what I call a little “frou-frou” dog), but the humor falls flat–none of the dogs are interesting, especially the main one, Rosie, and that’s the smooch of death.  It’s all very Point A to Point B, checklist-type writing, with Maurice being the big dog with the deep voice, Fifi, the little dog with the high voice, and milquetoast Rosie being the happy/moderate/boring happy mid-sized dog.

This book tries to be about dogs making friends with other dogs, which, according to Rosie, if you want to make a friend, all you have to do is ask.  That’s it. Nothing about how to actually be a friend. 

I generally read children’s books more than once, but this was such a chore to get through, I didn’t wish to revisit it; likewise, my daughter showed no interest.  In fact, I disliked the illustrations so much, I had a tough time coming up with a suggested activity (for once, I will not be using an ALA book in conjunction with an activity).  

On that note, I suggest reading Clifford Goes to Kindergarten by Malcolm Bridwell.  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23399252-clifford-goes-to-kindergarten?ac=1&from_search=true. 

Suggested activity:  In Clifford, the schoolchildren do several activities during the course of the day–such as answering questions using a yes or no board (I use flashcards).  You can blend this with a show-and-tell activity by asking your child yes or no questions pertaining to the toy, book, or object they’ve picked out (sort of an early version of true and false).  If you’ve ever seen the classic game show, “What’s My Line?” (e.g. “Is it bigger than a breadbox?”), that will give you a better idea on how to conduct this activity.  

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26102488-good-rosie

 

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