Writer’s Digest Wednesday Poetry Prompt #400: Event

Years ago, I remember watching the music video of Martina McBride’s “Independence Day.” It’s a great song (even though Sean Hannity uses it for his radio show/talking points monologue).

As a girl, I thought the song was simply about the Fourth of July, just as I thought “Rocky Mountain High” by John Denver was about a high school.

Ah, the innocence of children.

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Independence Day

She leaned on him,
but when he fell,
she found that she was
still standing—
sure of herself in every way
except her decision
to pick the right one
a second time.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/wednesday-poetry-prompts-400

 

 

#Micropoetry Monday: Love Comes Darkly

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She was a goddess of the Domestic Arts,
a knitter of broken hearts,
a cooker of comfort foods,
a cleaner of sacred spaces,
a maker of beds—a woman who had chosen that path
because it was the only one her husband showed her.

She quit her family, choosing her lover & his children,
but found herself haunted by the husband & daughter she’d left behind.
When her lover died & she returned years later,
she saw she’d built her happiness on their unhappiness.

She ended a marriage to begin a relationship
that would never end in wedlock,
hoping her new love would make
her husband’s same mistake.

She married the man of her recurring dreams,
the man of one woman’s single nightmare,
only to find when she slept,
he became more real.

She went to rehab to overcome her alcoholism,
only to find the man addicted to pornography
who became addicted to her.

Writer’s Digest Wednesday Poetry Prompt #398: Bug

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Mom’s Day Off

When Mom had a 24-hour bug,
the dishes did not do themselves,
and neither did the laundry get a bath.
There were sticky fingers & toes,
& a crusty little nose.
Paper was strewn about,
& Daddy had completely
checked out,
for he’d fallen asleep in the recliner
like Rip Van Suburban Dad,
& suffocated under all the toys
Hannah Banana Boo had ever had.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/wednesday-poetry-prompts-398

#Micropoetry Monday: Love Story

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He worked a dirty job,
she worked in sterility,
but his virility
overcame her infertility.

He married her for her beauty,
she married him for money,
but when he became handsome,
& she became rich,
they were happier with themselves.

To marry in the temple
would be to leave her father & mother
& cleave unto the faith of her husband.
She chose not the latter,
but the former,
& in doing so,
she was able to cleave unto the man
whose faith mirrored hers.

She grew up,
always wanted,
but never needed;
he matured,
always needed,
but never wanted.

She’d loved them both, & when one had died,
the other had become greater in her mind,
for he had died at the height of his perfection–
the peak of his valor–
so that no man in life could ever overcome
the shadow of his death.

#Micropoetry Mondays: Childhood Memories

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She’d fallen in love with Amy’s childhood,
& so she shared the memories as if they were her own,
& in so doing, she became what Amy might have been.

The stories they told, no one believed,
because what they saw through their limited prisms,
they could explain in the way only children can—
in innocence, the guilt of the adults around them.

Every year, her parents had Photoshopped
an age-progressed picture of her abducted brother,
so that when she crossed his path many years hence,
she knew, with startling clarity,
the man he had become,
the man who would take her life.

She learned “once upon a time”
& “happily ever after” from stories,
& everything in between from the lives
she lived through those stories.

Mr. Bob had been her imaginary friend.
When she came upon the grown-up version of him,
she knew he’d been very real to her mother.

#Micropoetry Monday: Love Comes Darkly

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Their romance was a one-act play,
their marriage,
a Shakespearean tragedy in 5 acts.
The honeymoon was over before it began,
but the potential of the life she carried
held it all together till the final scene.

He married her for her beauty,
she married him for money,
but when he became handsome,
& she became rich,
they were happier with themselves.

They loved one another
to the exclusion of all others;
their compassion for the guilty
diminished what the innocent
could have used.

He was unique & handsomely-made–
without blemish;
she was scarlet with sin,
with skin as white as snow,
yet it was her life that made the greater sacrifice.

She had been raised to put her marriage first,
& in so doing,
she had put herself second.
Her children could never imagine a Father’s love,
having never seen it in their own.

20 Things My Mother Taught Me: A Mother’s Day Message

Mom

  1. You don’t have to be a stay-at-home mom to be a good mom.  Dads are capable of raising children, too, just as women are capable of serving in wars.
  2. Do not repeat your parents’ mistakes.  My mom didn’t believe in whipping because she was whipped as a child, and it was always a dehumanizing experience. Contrary to conservative belief, my brother and I didn’t fear our parents and turned out to be good citizens and innately kind human beings.
  3. Just because you love your children differently, doesn’t mean you don’t love them equally.
  4. The military is a worthy career choice.
  5. Tell your daughter she’s pretty.  (Her parents never did and so she grew up believing she was ugly.)
  6. Cancer schmancer.  You get it a second time, you fight it a second time.  Fighting till the end doesn’t make one’s death any less “dignified.”
  7. Perfectionism can be a hindrance to starting and finishing things.
  8. If you want your kid to be a Christian, take them to church.  My mom has often said she regretted not being stronger about this with my brother.  Church attendance doesn’t make you a Christian, but it can help solidify the foundation poured at home.
  9. Kelly is not a girl’s name.  American girls stole it.  (My brother’s name is Kelly Morgan.)
  10. Even if your parents weren’t perfect, it is your duty to take care of them for raising you to maturity.
  11. It’s okay to get really pissed off and throw things.  Just don’t throw them at people.
  12. Let your child pursue that which moves them.  For my brother, it’s music; for me, it’s writing.  Encourage them.
  13. Empathy is one of the greatest of all virtues.
  14. If you have one good friend in a lifetime, you’re lucky.
  15. Marry who you want, regardless of what your parents think.
  16. Eat your meat well-done.  Her dad grew up on a farm and knew the deal.  If you look like a hick for ordering it that way, so be it.
  17. Don’t be afraid to accept help, even if that help is from the government (as long as you are trying to better yourself in the process, in which you will be paying it all back via taxes).
  18. Dad’s food might give you ringworm.
  19. I was a baby before I was born.
  20. Let your children know they can always come home if they need to.  Love really is an open door.

And this Sunday’s Instagram post, which seemed befitting the holiday:

Revive the art of conversation peg

She had them put down their devices
to get a CLUE over some CHESS pie.
Mom had the MONOPOLY on sociability
that night she took a RISK by shaking things up.
When they all made plans for another night,
she saw it hadn’t been a TRIVIAL PURSUIT.