#Micropoetry Monday: The Lighter Side (Grammar Edition)

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The Fanboys—
a passel of 7 devils—
had given
the Comma Queen
of Oxford
conjunctivitis
with their incessant need
for attention,
so much so,
that she chose to sacrifice
her life
for the Semicolon.

When the Writing Lab
decided to give
performance art a shot
by putting on a play,
it was fraught with errors:
The sentences ran on too long
& there were too many commas—
all the while semicolons
wandered around,
unsure of their placement.
The villain was a dangling modifier,
which was a problem,
as no one knew what it was;
by the time the audience figured it out,
the story had been killed.

He was Times New Roman,
feeling superior with his flair at every end;
she was Arial,
feeling equally so with her minimalistic look.
When Comic Sans came along,
crossing their lines & bleeding into their text,
they collaborated with Calibri
& sought to kick this whimsical little upstart
off the Typography Team.

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Writer’s Digest November Poem-a-Day 2017 Challenge #13. Theme: City

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Conquer by Confusion

Grammarcity Park had two regions—
the rotten North Egg,
and the equally rotten South Egg—
hatched by two gangs known as
“The Pros” and “The Seven Cons”
(the latter also known as “The Fanboys”).

Though such activity was criminal
in this dark city—
overpopulated with commas,
nightly knifings with em dashes,
and unclean colons—
little was done to muck out
this den of corruption.

One night of Celtic Thunder,
the Fanboys decided the only way
to defeat the South Pros
was by appealing to the Chicago-style
gubbermint,
and, in the name of equality,
forcing them to become
gender-neutral,
thus stripping them of their
individuality—
the core of their identities.

And so, while the Pros were trying
to figure who was who
and what end was up,
“The Fanboys” band played on,
still making connections.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2017-november-pad-chapbook-challenge-day-13