Poem-a-Day April 2019 Writer’s Digest Challenge #7. Theme: Jealousy #aprpad

Jenvy

When Jealousy met Envy,
she met her match.
This two-headed, green-eyed monster
grew more luminous
when they learned that it was “Jenvy”
that brought about the first murder
on Earth,
which made them one of the 7 deadly sins.

But when they met Admiration,
that entity was the sword that slayed the dragon,
for a brother who was inspired
by another brother’s success
would become greater himself
than a brother who simply seethed
with Jenvy.

https://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2019-april-pad-challenge-day-

Poem-a-Day 2017 Writer’s Digest Challenge #22. Theme: Fable

This was a piece to a longer poem (“Strolling Across Campus on a Monday Afternoon”), which is known as a “walking poem.”  My poetry professor had our class go outside and just record our observations in our journal.  We had to choose a line from Anne Waldman’s “Fast Speaking Woman” at random (the equivalent of flipping through a telephone book and blindly putting our finger on a name), and implement it (though I did not include it today).

Since it is Earth Day, I thought this would be perfect, because in Mormon mythology/doctrine (depending on your perspective), they believe in a Heavenly Father and a Heavenly Mother, which makes sense, as in Genesis 1:26, it reads:  And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.

Our Heavenly Lineage

The sun is like Mother Nature kissing me,
the breeze,
the brushing of her hair as she does so,
blessing me.

I think of the blue God,
the green Goddess,
coexisting—
our ecological parents—
for are not humans merely water and earth,
fused with a touch of the Divine?

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 22

Poem-a-Day Writer’s Digest Challenge #19. Theme: Authority

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The Final Authority

“So God created man in his own image,
in the image of God created he him;
male and female created he them.”
Genesis 1:27

I was who I was,
two weeks ago yesterday.
The day of our wedding then,
is already a memory.

I’d found God before I married you,
and then I found myself.
The person you wed is gone,
but you’ve not forgotten.

I am not your child,
your soldier,
or your little pet.

I am a grown woman,
with goals, ideas, and opinions of my own.
I will support you,
as I hope you will support me,
so that we can both become the best we can be.

I didn’t know what I wanted when I married you,
I only knew I wanted you.
You wanted me then–
please, want all of me now.
Love me for my goodness,
not my obedience.

We can be as different as we are equal–
as happy in one another’s successes as we are in our own.

I am not an extension of you,
but rather am One with you.
Be my husband,
my co-pilot,
my friend and soul-mate,
but don’t be my final authority.

Poem-a-Day Writer’s Digest Challenge #14. Theme: Honest and/or Dishonest

I have found I gravitate towards long, narrative poems (or, if I don’t have a “story” idea, I write something short and silly).  The following is what one might refer to as a “shaggy God” poem.  This is basically the story of Genesis, told a different way (with shades of Mormonism and Scientology).  This was a fun “what-if” type of exercise.

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The Honest Tree

I am who I am,
barefoot in the garden,
in the midst of the lambs.
Fruits sweet,
birds tweet,
the grass soft beneath my feet.

My husband is not with me,
for he gathers,
but toils not.

From another world we came—
a world we cannot remember.
Like the Ark of Noah that has been prophesied,
we floated through the atmosphere in a vessel,
through the starry galaxy and to this green planet.

In the center of this orchard,
there is a tree—
with fruit as white as can be.
It glows like the firmament,
like the Creator of All Things—
the only God we know,
the only God we are to know.

An asp approaches me,
slithering on the ground without a sound.
He is a beguiling creature,
and I trust his quiet nature.
He is a charmer,
“Take a bite,” he says,
“for it is sweetest above all,
and you will no more be benighted.”

I am drawn to the fruit–
to the light–
and I think, just a little one,
but it is bitter.
There is a rumble in the sky,
and I know I’ve earned the wrath of the Cloud Knitter.
“I told you not to eat of this tree,
for now you are as I once was,
and will suffer pain,
as the Earth will suffer all calamity.”

I weep,
for now the veil has been ripped off–
I am not a beautiful virgin on her wedding night,
but am a crooked old woman with hooves and claws—
a creature of many flaws.
And yet,
I have a consciousness,
an awareness I had not before,
and I am more than I was before.
The scales have fallen from my eyes,
and I see with such clarity,
true goodness and beauty.

I must get Adam to eat,
lest we be separated forever,
and this new world end with us.
I look up to the God of Kolob,
and now the Planet Earth,
praying for a respite from death–
for another birth.

“Do my will,” the Tree Weaver says,
“for what I hath joined together,
neither man nor beast may tear asunder.”

I go to do His bidding,
and find Adam tending to the flock,
and tell him, “Take, eat,
for it will seal us together forever.”

He heeds my word,
and at first bite,
he knows Death will touch our lips,
kissing us good-bye.
But this was how it was to be all along–
for we will no longer live as children,
ignorant of sin,
but will be given the chance to know wrong
and the choice to do right,
so we can be with God again.

I look up to the heavens and smile,
and God baptizes us in the rain.
“For the remission of sins,” God says,
“which hath brought about the greater good.
I baptize thee in My Name,
for I Am Who I Am.”