Poem-a-Day November 2018 Writer’s Digest Challenge #13. Theme: Quiet/Loud

They Hear

They piped music into their ears
as they walked,
jogged,
ran.
They shut out rural sounds,
city noise,
& sometimes the quiet—
for though they voiced their thoughts,
even as they posted those same thoughts
(only angrier),
they could not bear to think them.
Unlike in Harrison Bergeron,
their thoughts were not interrupted,
but they interrupted their own thoughts
with song lyrics or books on tape,
for they had become consumers of pop culture,
pop psychology,
& bullshit self-help
that left them helpless.

2018 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 13

Poem-a-Day April 2018 Writer’s Digest Challenge #20. Theme: “Earlier Line”

When Art Lost its Tangibility

1000 Years in the Future

With every year that passed,
the world became more senseless.
Crayons disappeared,
markers faded,
colored pencils became dull.
There was no more paint,
no more sculpture.
Music–
created by the computers
or their programmers–
was piped in everywhere,
scattering the thoughts of the populace
as in the world of Harrison Bergeron.

There was a uniformity to everything–
a measure of control in a chaotic world
that sought to make everything smaller,
greener.

For they said the earth had run out of room
for art that took up actual space.
Through computer applications,
a New Art for a New Era was created
by the creators–
as virtual space was infinite space.
Thus the tactile processes of creating art
was lost,
and craft stores had gone the way of
small businesses.
Photographers and graphic designers became
the modern artists.

And so, when batteries died and
the electricity went out,
the art went with it.
And this art that had lost its smell
was but a memory
that no description
could ever do justice,
for human recall was the height
of fallibility.

And when the power grid shut down,
a group of bored children came upon an old schoolhouse
that had not been touched by urban decay,
but by rural depression, isolation, and apathy.
It was in a cobwebby closet that they found
the pencils and the crayons,
yet they knew not what to do with them.

But then one remembered a film from long ago–
saved from the Ban and Burn 100 years before–
where fingers weren’t the tools,
but rather, held the tools.
It was then that human hands reclaimed the functionality
that had once created beauty
(even as the artists of the New Era could only capture
and rearrange it)–
the kind of art that was as messy
as it was beautiful.

And when the power returned forty years later
following The Rebuilding,
the world glowed with screens once more,
but it had become alive again through a New Renaissance.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2018-april-pad-challenge-day-20