#Micropoetry Monday: The Writer’s Life

typewriter-1170657_1920

She was criticized for writing puff pieces
as light & airy as meringue,
but only those who knew her best
knew that she had many thoughts beyond
food & entertainment & all the little extras
that connected people of all kinds–
she just didn’t have the time
nor the energy
to deal with hate mail.

Blackie & Blondie had journalists for parents,
& so they grew up being asked
Who, What, Where, When, & so forth.
They learned how to remember
the important things,
so that they could tell the stories
that were true.
These stories they told of others
inspired them to live the kind of lives
worth writing about.
Because their parents had asked them questions,
they had learned to do the same
with everyone they met.
Though they’d been called inquisitive at best
& intrusive at worst,
they did learn something most valuable,
& that was how to take an interest
(& a very human one at that)
in other people.

She wrote the life she wanted,
only to realize that as she mirrored her life
after her own creations,
she was writing her future.

Advertisements

Poem-a-Day April 2018 Writer’s Digest Challenge #14. Theme: Report

psc bldg 96

Starr Reporter

Starr was a crackerjack ink slinger
for The Scoop at Pence State College,
covering events such as the Modern Mime show,
put on by the ASL Lousy Poets Club
(a small group),
archery intramurals on Valentine’s Day,
(where Professor Kewpid was the target),
& The Great Brown-Bagged Fake n’ Bake Swap
from extra credit-hungry culinary students.

She treated her articles like she treated people–
making what the world deemed unimportant feel important,
for she’d been taught that genuine class
was neither in the threads of her clothes
nor in the strands of her DNA,
but in how she treated others.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2018-april-pad-challenge-day-14