Writer’s Digest Wednesday Poetry Prompt #364; Theme: Let the Good Times Roll

Every Wednesday, upon waking, I check the Writer’s Digest website for the prompt so I can have all day to brainstorm.  This morning, I simply asked my three-year-old daughter, “So, what do you think about ‘letting the good times roll’?”, and she said, “Play-doh!”, so that’s how I came up with this.

playdoh

 Play-Doh Fun

A good time is all rolled up
in variety of color and cup—
purple spaghetti with orange meatballs,
kangaroo crackers,
and stickies for the wall;

blueberries that are red,
raspberries that are blue,
cookie cutters that are borrowed,
and peas like pearls in a queue;

elephants with cattails,
horses with ponytails,
and fork work like inverted Braille;

neon green hamburgers and hot pink hotdogs
reshaped into swirly planets with rings,
and stripes mixed with polka dots;

shapeless shapes,
smileys from pencil pokes,
and handprints stained with newsprint;

bows for Minnie Mouse,
plugs for her ears,
and beanbag chairs for the dollhouse;

more bows for Minnie,
something for the bellybutton,
and toes with royal jelly for din-dinny;

it’s all in fun,
only to be stretched and folded,
and put away again.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/wednesday-poetry-prompts-364

 

Seven Ways I’ve Made Reading to My Baby Even More Fun for the Both of Us

I am not an early childhood education expert, but these are some things I’ve done:

  1. Whenever a word comes up like nose or foot, touch that part of your anatomy of hers.
  2. For shorter books, have a basket of objects close by that are mentioned in the book.  I do believe my daughter has associated the 2-D Minnie Mouse with the 3-D, as Minnie is one of her favorite toys and she gets excited whenever I break out, “5-Minute Minnie Tales”.
  3. If a word comes up that reminds you of a song, sing it.  Incorporating a song within a story breaks up the cadence of your voice and helps keep their attention.
  4. To keep it interesting for you, you can make up little stories about the pictures.  She will enjoy it, too.  You can be as serious or as silly as you like.  Pointing to certain animals and making animal noises is great fun.
  5. Use different accents.  For instance, I always take on an English accent whenever I read a nursery rhyme set there; whenever I sing, “When Irish Eyes are Smiling”, I do my best Irish brogue.  Also, when coming across words like fast or slow, I say the words in fast or slow motion, respectively.
  6. Use objects or hand gestures to help tell the story.  I’ve been teaching myself baby sign language and it really holds my daughter’s attention when I incorporate signs into a song.  I never realized how dexterous a hearing-impaired person has to be.
  7. Let her turn the page.  It’s okay to abbreviate, or improvise a story.  I’ve always been a creative person, but a new side of my creativity has been tapped while doing this activity with my daughter.  Encourage interaction, and take her hand to point to things, to help build those associations.

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