Writer’s Digest Wednesday Poetry Prompt #497: Practice

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How Grammerleigh Got Good at her Game 

She practiced her periods every month,
her commas whenever she needed to take a breath,
& her semicolons during those times 
when she felt like a nut 
& didn’t feel like a nut
at the same time.

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 497

Poem-a-Day November 2018 Writer’s Digest Challenge #12. Theme: Disaster

Writing Lab Blues

Sometimes she just wanted to say,
“No capitalization,
No punctuation,
No service,”
or that the use of the words “thing” and “stuff”
& the overuse of “very” and “really”
qualified as “enough was enough.”
She was a 1000-piece puzzle
who lost a piece every time
she read an essay that sought to answer the question,
“Is Google Making Us Stupid?”
So, she learned to start from scratch—
just as she had learned to bake—
for as much as she learned the Why
(even though she already knew the How),
she also learned that patience
was a learned virtue—
& that it was easier to do than teach.

2018 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 12

Poem-a-Day Writer’s Digest Challenge #10. Theme: How (blank)…

I thought this was one of the more creative challenges, and could see writing a whole series of How-To poems.  I had lots of fun with this one (which also took the least amount of time to write).  Enjoy!

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How the Colon Came to Be a Period

Colon Howell lived in the land of Alfabet City,
where all the punctuation was quite witty,
though he was tired of floating over vowels
because of the nosebleeds that made him dizzy.

A fast-paced city it was,
all the marks running on and on,
never stopping–
so exhausting.

While strolling through the park one day,
in the merry month of June,
he was taken by surprise,
by a bunch of loons—
We’s who’d read Ayn Rand and
wanted to become I’s;
they took his blue eye,
but he got away before
they were able to get his brown,
and he was bounced out of town.

When he returned undercover,
dressed as a semicolon,
he leaked his story on YouTube and HuffPost,
with an eyepatch over the part that was swollen,
full of ripostes.
Through his ordeal,
he found a new purpose,
for run-on sentences stopped,
and he was hailed a hero.