Poem-a-Day April 2019 Writer’s Digest Challenge #1. Theme: Morning #aprpad

photo-1518199266791-5375a83190b7

She Said, He Did

It was the morning after she’d said no,
and she rose with the sun alone.
She’d had a good time, and sometimes,

that’s all it was–
one night of a hundred others,
sifting through those who either wanted to make a dishonest woman out of her
or crown her as the heroine of their love story.
But the sun seemed just a little bit brighter
when her phone rang,
and he asked her out again,
already knowing what her answer would be then,
and what it would be once again at the end of the night.

https://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2019-april-pad-challenge-day-1

Advertisements

Writer’s Digest Wednesday Poetry Prompt #465: Exploration

seascape-1239727_1280

Deep Exploration

When they explored the land,
they saw how the faster travel and communication became,
the smaller the world became.

When they explored the spaces beneath them,
they saw the dark side of the earth–
an underworld untouched by the living
but populated by the dead.

When they explored the space above them,
they were in wonder of all they did not know
and all they could not see.
And it was there they hovered–
in awe of the God who would not show His face,
but had set it all in motion,
this God whose voice was unheard
but whose signature was on everything.

When they explored one anothers’ bodies,
making love on the beach at low tide
where the honeymoon rose and set on their salt-beaded skin,
their hair like the rim of margarita glasses,
they lost themselves in each other,
even as they found themselves in awe of one another
and of everything they were;
for they were the dust of earth,
even as they were the debris of the heavens,
rearranged in such a way
that made them perfect for each other.

https://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/wednesday-poetry-prompts-465

Book Review: What Alice Forgot

201506-summer-reading-12-949x1356 (1)

On the surface, this was a breezy, light-hearted romp about a woman who loses the last 10 years of her life via amnesia.

However, once I read past the first few chapters, I realized that it had more depth, though I found myself wanting more out of this book than it wanted to give.

The book’s overall message (to me) was that kids and shared memories are enough to hold a marriage together, even when both parties don’t change anything about themselves, but rather, just accept that such is married life. (And that sleeping with other people while separated is acceptable.  Why are you dating anyone when you’re just starting to get over a relationship, when you’re not even divorced yet?  What is wrong with being single for a while and getting your life back in order first?)

The premise reminded me of my own life, and how different I am at 37 than I was at 27–before marriage and a child–and how horrified I know I would feel to wake up at not only being married to a stranger, but a mother to a little one.

When I was in my twenties, I was rather la-di-da, but once I became a wife and mother in my thirties, it was as if I’d been under a spell that had finally broken.  It was as if something in me had snapped, and I realized I needed to get serious about my life.  My 27-year-old self wouldn’t recognize my 37-year-old self (though I think she would very much approve). 

Eerily, Alice’s progression very nearly mirrored mine.

I thought the mysterious Gina (or rather, the idea of her was more fascinating as she got so little screen time) could’ve been developed so much more, as she had such an influence on Alice.  However, I abolutely hated the parts told from Frannie’s point-of-view; her story (told through letters to her dead fiance) about her new boyfriend was boring as hell and added absolutely nothing.

The relationships Alice had with her husband and boyfriend did not interest me, as those men were crashing bores–bland, bland, bland.

Though I enjoyed Elizabeth’s story (told via letter to the even more mysterious “Dr. Hodges”), I didn’t like that her whole existence was dependent upon someone else’s.  If things hadn’t (magically) worked out in her favor, she would’ve never been able to get it together.

The ending, set 10 or so years into the future, was a nice touch, but rather unsatisfying, as there wasn’t a good case for it to end the way it did.  I felt like the book ended up being more of a “love conquers all” story than a self-love story of how a woman took an unexpected vacation from herself to become her best self.  

Overall, Moriarty gets a B-.  She did a great job characterizing the kids and some of the more minor characters.  I absolutely loved the idea about the giant lemon meringue pie made using construction equipment.

“Alice” just could’ve used a bit more editing and tighter writing.

 

Writer’s Digest Wednesday Poetry Prompt #460: Nourishment

chocolate-2896696_960_720

Kandi Barr’s Quandary

When a beau broke up with her
(it was never the other way around),
she turned to Mr. Goodbar.
When she lost another job
(always a dead-end one),
she found a Payday.
When she needed a break from the world
(a world where size 28W was hard to find),
she opted for a Milky Way.
When she didn’t know what the hell she wanted,
she went for a Whatchamacallit.
Then she met the man
who gave her a 100 Grand–
a man who knew she was the one–
even though he couldn’t wrap his arms around her.
The fact that she was king-sized & marshmallow-soft
appealed to him,
so when she became happy,
the stress (& the fat) melted away,
but so did his fat fetish-based love.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/wednesday-poetry-prompts-460

Sweet Little Nothings

Leave your phone behind

He was a blond seeking a brunette,
scrolling through the gorgeous arrangements of pixels
with impressive stats,
but the day he was separated
from his virtual connection to the world,
he found a deeper connection in the one woman
who was everything the others were not—
whose essence was incense to his soul,
whose taste was strawberry coulis to his lips,
& whose voice was warm to his ear.

Poem-a-Day 2017 Writer’s Digest Challenge #28. Theme: Smell

couple-861738_960_720

Her Sense, His Scent

Tony was Nautica,
Gino was speed stick
with a hint of spice,
and Trace was a Stetson man.
Ryan was Eternity,
and he was hers
for just that.

She loved them all,
save the first,
who had led her
to the rest,
for it was after the first,
that she no longer knew
what she wanted,
but what she didn’t want.

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2017-april-pad-challenge-day-28