Poem-a-Day April 2019 Writer’s Digest Challenge #4. Theme: Painter #aprpad

Norman Rockwell

Illustrator or artist,
he captured what he saw,
even as “the greats” captured
what they imagined,
& does that make it any more
or any less real?

2019 April PAD Challenge: Day 4

Summer Writing Mini-Workshop: Publications I Submit To

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There are many markets for the personal essay (http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/readers_write), for no one can tell the story you have lived & from your unique perspective. They are the easiest to write because they require little research. https://sarahleastories.com/2016/10/01/waves-in-a-timeline-personal-essay/

Greeting cards are a fun way for poets to make real money. The Blue Mountain Arts greeting card company is one of them. http://www.sps.com/poetry/index.html. Note: Having a worksheet of all the different greetings helps me generate more content. http://www.studiomiragegreetings.com/greeting-card-occasions-list/

If you need help getting started, try submitting to a publication with a prompt. http://www.thefirstline.com

You don’t have to agree with a publication’s vision to submit to them. You just need to be interested in the topic or theme. http://www.writersofthefuture.com/enter-writer-contest/

If you find yourself channeling your inner Dave Barry or Erma Bombeck, submit to “The Lighter Side” section of The Saturday Evening Post. http://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/about/submission-guidelines#humor

Writer’s Digest offers several free ways to get published in their magazine. The 5-Minute Memoirs is one of them. https://sarahleastories.com/2014/07/10/5-minute-memoir-to-writers-digest-former-submission/

“Chicken Soup for the Soul” is all about writing what one knows, with calls for submissions that relate to most people. That said, don’t get discouraged: You will receive no notification upon reception, only upon acceptance. http://www.chickensoup.com/story-submissions/possible-book-topics

 

 

For Writers: Time Wasted vs. Time Invested

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Finding the time to write requires figuring out, over time, what is a good investment of your time and what is not.  Here is what I have found:

  1. Trying to write for a publication or contest because it either pays well or the entry is free when you have no interest in the topic, theme, or publication itself, will take more time than writing two pieces you are passionate about for a publication you read.  For example, there was a national women’s magazine on which the short story topic was, “What is the bravest thing you have ever done?”  When I saw the previous years’ winning entries–serving in Afghanistan and other equally courageous things–I thought, well, I got my wisdom teeth pulled without being put under.  Pass.
  2. Don’t write for LinkedIn on a regular basis unless you write boring, “businessy” articles/listicles as passionless as cooking without love, implementing lingo like analytics, logistics, and statistics (okay, sometimes stats can be sexy),  I don’t write articles for LinkedIn, but if something I’ve written is appropriate for the platform, I’ll post it on LinkedIn Pulse.  Whatever you do, don’t post part of the article, and then require people to click on your blog link to read the rest.
  3. Keep virtual clutter to a minimum.  Delete bookmarks you will never use, e-mails you will never read again, etc.
  4. Don’t have more than one account on any social networking site.  I tried to have both an author Twitter account and a fictional character Twitter account.  A lot of time was spent signing in and out, and sometimes, I’d get the two crossed.  I had the character account for a year-and-a-half, and have been repurposing the tweets for my Fiction Fridays series, just as the micropoetry I used to write for Twitter daily ended up becoming my Micropoetry Monday series, so you could say my stint on Twitter helped me become a regular blogger (versus a sporadic one).
  5. Keep track of what you write.  I have a master list of pieces I’ve written (with keywords for easy look-up), and where I have submitted each.  I’ve written so much poetry, I’ve had to divide it up into “anthologies.”  (Submittable is good for keeping track, but not every publication uses it.)
  6. Plan for writing contests a year in advance.  That way you never miss a deadline and you’re always submitting quality work.
  7. Have a submission schedule for the publications you write for on a regular basis. You don’t want to overload a publication with submissions, because they might think you’re just using the “kitchen-sink theory” (throwing everything at them and seeing what they’ll take).  For example, the fifteenth of every month, I submit a poem to a certain publication I adore–one I’ve been published in before.
  8. Twitter is a colossal waste of time, though I still have all my blog posts auto-post, adding the hashtags separately.  There are too many expectations of reciprocity–you need true fans, not just those who follow to get a follow back.  You need readers who aren’t also writers.
  9. Be selective with what television programs you watch.  I only watch a couple a week, and maybe a couple of movies.  Every once in awhile, I’ll binge-watch a television show, but time watching TV is time not writing.  Don’t watch something because you’re bored; write something, for writing is doing.
  10. Read.  You need to read everyday (not just blog posts, even like this one), but the kind of slow reading that draws you in).  I’ve gotten into reading pieces on The Saturday Evening Post’s website.  I’m enjoying what I’m reading, and at the same time, getting a better idea of what they go for.

Saturday Evening Post: Honorable Mention

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So I just entered The Saturday Evening Post’s “Great American Short Story” contest, and read on their site that as long as a story was only published on a personal blog, it would qualify for submission.  That led me to inquire if it would be permissible for me to post my story that placed as an Honorable Mention in their contest two years ago (and published in their digital anthology); they said that was fine (and also appreciated the mention).

My short story was based on a cold case (literally and figuratively) of a grave-robber who haunted Pensacola, Florida, in the Fifties.  It’s a mystery that spans generations and ends up answering the question, “Whodunit?”

I just posted the first several lines, and included the story in its entirety as a PDF for those interested in reading the whole thing.

The Ghoul of Whitmire Cemetery

“Grandma,” Ellie Dolan said, holding the birdlike, bluish-white hand of the woman who had raised her after her mother’s passing.  “I have wonderful news.  Mr. Trune loved the stories I sent him, and he’s going to give me my own space.  He really dug the idea of a cold case column.”

She had expected her grandmother to look pleased, but she only looked troubled.

The Ghoul of Whitmire Cemetery