16 Easy Ways for Improving Your College Essay (Before Bringing it to the Writing Lab)

Beaker Beaker

I never cease to be amazed at the number of students who don’t use the Writing Lab — a free service (well, it’s included in your tuition) offered by my alma mater— especially since it doesn’t require making an appointment (which is why I hardly use the Lab at my current uni; I’m a fan of “first come, first served”).

After my first semester of community college, I ran everything by the on-campus Lab; however, I loved sending my creative pieces (for my poetry and creative writing classes) to the OWL (Online Writing Lab), as I received such thoughtful feedback. One of the pieces I submitted (“A Memoir of Mother Goose,” which has since been published on Medium) won first place in the college’s annual writing contest; the Writing Lab Supervisor helped me tighten up the structure, making it not only something I could be proud of but something that honored the people whose stories I told.

I’m the type of person who doesn’t want anyone to see my rough draft — only my polished one — and for this reason: the fewer small mistakes there are, the more likely that whoever reads my paper will catch the big mistakes. If your tutor is having to wade through too many misspellings, punctuation errors, and/or too much bad grammar, they might miss things like content and structure.

At the Writing Lab, I tutor college students (not just in English, but in history, science, and even graphic design — as they pertain to writing), I’ve noticed a lot of things students could do that would make their session even more productive and help them become better writers. I realize many hate writing, and that’s unfortunate, but to do well in school and at many jobs, you have to write capably, such as the cover letters and resumes before hire and the emails you may have to write after. 

As for college writing, here are 13 things all students should do with their paper before they come to the Writing Lab.

  • Outline your paper, on paper (not on your phone). This way, you’re not starting with a blank page. Craft your thesis and topic sentences. Once you have those and your paraphrases and/or quotations, you can structure your paper and fill in the blanks. However, if you just need help getting started, the Lab is great for that, too. After all, the Lab was where I learned how to construct an outline. Once I learned thesis statements, topic sentences, and how to break something down to the smallest of details, I was able to write any research paper. These things made me a better writer, for I learned how to structure a paper and avoid parallelism.
  • Read the story (or whatever it is) before you start writing about it. Read all your sources, highlighting and annotating as you go. This especially helps if the book is long and/or boring. Post-its are great for marking paragraphs in longer works. 
  • Bring a copy of the assignment. Just telling the tutor you have to write an essay won’t help them help you. Are you writing a reflection, a literary analysis, a research paper? Tutors need a frame of reference.
  • Run everything through spell check, even if Google Docs isn’t flagging anything. Just do it. Then, copy and paste your document into Word and run a check. Some people like the Hemingway app, but I think it sucks (even though I still use it on occasion). Maybe if it was called the Shirley Jackson app, I’d like it better; Grammarly also offers a free app. Even though I know how to spell, and everyone knows I know how to spell, it is quite embarrassing when I publish something with a misspelling, especially since a handful of my friends have English degrees.
  • Write your paper as soon as you can, so you can leave time to put your paper away for a day or two and go back at it fresh. Let it be a smelly pile of rubbish — just get it out of your head and onto the paper/screen. Take notes while in class (you don’t have to type them up, as you won’t use them all, thus saving a step); don’t just scribble what the professor says, but what other students say and what you are thinking about what they are all saying. This has been a lifesaver in my American Lit class (where I’ve only liked one of the four books we’ve read thus far).
  • Print out your paper, so you can make marks on it, which leads to the next step. 
  • Read your work aloud. I do this with every paper that comes into the Lab unless the topic is a sensitive one (we have a private room for that if need be). The eye catches grammar, punctuation, and misspellings; the ear captures more content-related elements, such as how your paper flows. One of the students I did this with was catching her mistakes as I read, and she was amazed at how much of a difference reading it aloud made. I want the students who come in to remember my advice and use it, so they won’t keep making the same mistakes (but rather, different ones).
  • Make the changes to your paper that the tutor suggested and then bring it back for another read, so he or she has a clean copy. Ideally, you will get a second (and different) set of eyes to coach you on how to improve your document and writing skills. I remember asking my supervisor why the students could only check two categories (e.g., grammar, punctuation, sentence errors, content, structure, formatting, and documentation) rather than get it all done in one sitting, and she told that students would be overwhelmed at all the changes they would have to make at once. 
  • Remove contractions (unless they’re in a direct quote). Look on the sunny side: Doing this will increase your word count. 
  • Connotation matters. For example, don’t refer to children as kids (also known as young goats). Use academic language. 
  • Be precise. Don’t use the words “thing” and “stuff.” Spell out what the “thing” is. For example, instead of saying, “Writing was her favorite thing,” say, “Writing was her favorite hobby, pastime, activity, etc.”
  • Don’t use filler words/phrases. Some examples are “very,” “really,” and “just” (the last of which I am guilty of). Rather than saying something is “very important,” say it’s “paramount.” As for phrases, “to be perfectly honest” is the one I hate the most because of course, you’re going to be perfectly honest with your reader.
  • Properly format and cite. You don’t want to lose points on something easy. If you think this stuff is silly, remember, it’s all about attention to detail. I still think of the poor lady who lost a ton of money on Wheel of Fortune for saying “Seven Swans a-Swimmin’”, cutting the g off the gerund.
  • Don’t leave empty-handed. Get handouts from the Writing Lab on the particulars that confuse you (commas seem to be everyone’s Achilles heel), and keep the ones concerning formatting and documentation on hand. Unless you write college papers all the time, you won’t remember all the nuances.
  • Remember that tutors are lifelong learners. I still have to get help with something I am unfamiliar with sometimes. I remember a professor telling me that the difference between an educated person and an uneducated one was that the former knew where to find the answer (and it’s not always Google or an algorithm).
  • Tutors will help you cite sources, but libraries will help you find them. When you find a source, copy and paste the link into a Google Doc so you can find it later. I’ve seen students who will have a great quote but will be unable to use it because they can’t find where they got it. If I’m getting my information from a book, I use bookmarks and sticky notes.

Doing these things before you go into the Lab just might make a letter grade of difference.

Poem-a-Day November 2018 Writer’s Digest Challenge #12. Theme: Disaster

Writing Lab Blues

Sometimes she just wanted to say,
“No capitalization,
No punctuation,
No service,”
or that the use of the words “thing” and “stuff”
& the overuse of “very” and “really”
qualified as “enough was enough.”
She was a 1000-piece puzzle
who lost a piece every time
she read an essay that sought to answer the question,
“Is Google Making Us Stupid?”
So, she learned to start from scratch—
just as she had learned to bake—
for as much as she learned the Why
(even though she already knew the How),
she also learned that patience
was a learned virtue—
& that it was easier to do than teach.

2018 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 12

Poem-a-Day November 2018 Writer’s Digest Challenge #3. Theme: Tired of (Blank)

Outnumbered

She’d just passed her last math class,
only to pick super-mathy Astronomy
as her natural science.
When she passed what seemed like
Astrophysics,
she became a high school tutor.
When the math tutors deserted her,
going on an American Pi Day road trip
to every diner on Route 66,
she had to dredge up
from her repressed memory
all that nonsense about imaginary numbers.
When she finally escaped math,
it was too late,
for her number was up.

2018 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 3

Ten Study Habits for College Students

  1. Search for ways to make the studying fun (i.e. by turning it into a game.  Teach yourself the Montessori way).  I love crosswords.  Unlike word searches, you actually “learn by doing”.  This is great for building vocabulary (most subjects have a lingo of their own, be it computers, engineering, medicine, etc.), because you learn as you create the puzzle, and then learn a second time as you complete it.  It also helps to use the word in a sentence.
  2. Come up with catchy ways to remember things.  I like rhymes and acronyms.  They may seem silly, but no one else will have to know how you remember but you.  It does help to have a creative mind when it comes to studying, as you are essentially becoming your own teacher.  Learning P.E.M.D.A.S. (“Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally”) was extremely helpful to me with solving mathematical equations in high school.
  3. Repetition, repetition, repetition.  It takes me about five times of waiting on a customer before I can remember the name that goes with the face.  It also helps to write something down in a notebook, rather than just typing it into a computer.  Illustrative objects, like charts and graphs, are also helpful.
  4. Write!  Learn how to write creative nonfiction, and write on the subject you’re studying, even if you don’t plan on submitting it anywhere.  You will be able to think critically about the subject, rather than just memorize, which will (ironically) help you remember better.  Apply what you know, and study what you don’t.  I learned more (and retained more of what I learned) about Ayn Rand when writing a paper on her, rather than just reading a bio.
  5. Read!  Not just your textbook, but the “For Dummies” books are helping me pass my Computer Concepts class.  Sometimes just reading about the same subject (with the information presented in a different way) will help that light bulb go off.  We all process things differently.  That’s why good teachers are so important.  I took the same subject in high school with two different teachers, which yielded vastly different results.
  6. Be organized.  Keep notes of what exactly you’re having trouble with.  Do what you can, and what you can’t, make a date with your professor to help you.  The more organized you are, the more time they’ll be able to spend helping you, rather than going through things you already know.  Sometimes, all it takes is the answer to one question, as you can’t build a house without first building the foundation.  Also, seek to connect with some of your classmates.  I found a very cheap tutor through e-mailing my entire class.
  7. YouTube.  It’s a great resource for learning just about anything.  Best of all, it’s free.
  8. Ask questions.  Use social media.  I learned how to “age-grade” my work on a Microsoft Word program through a Facebook friend.  This friend, who teaches how to blog on WordPress, taught me how to calculate what age group I was writing for.
  9. Caffeine.  Sometimes, it just helps you focus more.  I was able to knock out several computer projects in one night with the help of one Starbucks espresso.
  10. When the weather is nice, take advantage of it.  We need nutrition (which means lots of water), sunshine, fresh air, adequate and good quality sleep, etc.  Exercise is a bonus.  There is nothing like the natural high after exercise that makes you feel like you can conquer the world.